Peach Bourbon Foster

I created this recipe for two reasons:

1. My dad is a bourbon connoisseur.

2. My family owns and operates 100-acre peach orchard in Linden, California.

My favorite part about this recipe is the simplicity. This recipe comes together in minutes and is perfect for topping ice cream, waffles or crepes. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family does!

Peach foster is the same concept of flaming sugary syrup with fruit (typically bananas). This recipe is best served directly after making. All of your guests will want to see the flames in the pan from the bourbon.

The recipe calls for clingstone peaches. This particular type is used for canning. The flesh of the fruit sticks to the stone or pit. Freestones on the other hand release the flesh smooth and easily from the pit. They are for fresh market. My family grows clingstone so that is the variety I always have on hand during the season.

To make the peach foster combine butter, brown sugar, and nutmeg over high heat. The mixture will begin to bubble and thicken. Add the peaches, spooning the sugar syrup over them. When the peaches become soft, but not mushy remove from heat. Pour in bourbon and ignite with a match, lighter, or the flame from the burner.

Serve this over vanilla bean ice cream or gelato. Or, try something even more decadent— as a waffle topping or over crepes!


Peach Bourbon Foster

Ingredients:

3 cling peaches, peeled and sliced into bite-sized chunks

1/4 cup unsalted butter

1/2 cup dark brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg

1/2 cup bourbon 

Directions:

  1. Place the peaches in a 10-inch heavy skillet with the butter, brown sugar, and nutmeg over high heat. Once the sugar starts to dissolve, begin spooning the sauce over the peaches. Remove from the heat when the sauce begins to thicken and bubble.

  2. Carefully pour the bourbon into the pan and ignite with a long match or stick lighter.

  3. Continue to cook until the flames die out and the sauce coats the back of a spoon. Serve immediately with ice cream, waffles or crepes.